#209: Tokyo Twilight

pjr2wdbcuhlspaopbj0uxrql0du#209 – Tokyo Twilight, (東京暮色), 1957, Yasujirō Ozu
jp

Two sisters find out the existence of their long-lost mother, but the younger cannot take the truth of being abandoned as a child.

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#233: Floating Weeds

fbplpl81kuhynzrluuj4wbh1qyl#233 – Floating Weeds, (浮草), 1959, Yasujirō Ozu
jp

A troupe of travelling players arrive at a small seaport in the south of Japan. Komajuro Arashi, the aging master of the troupe, goes to visit his old flame Oyoshi and their son Kiyoshi, even though Kiyoshi believes Komajuro is his uncle. The leading actress Sumiko is jealous and so, in order to humiliate the master, persuades the younger actress Kayo to seduce Kiyoshi.

#246: Early Summer

upyzmxaequfwrcroddeephjoubp#246 – Early Summer, (麦秋), 1951, Yasujirō Ozu
jp

Noriko lives in postwar Tokyo with her extended family. Although she enjoys her career and her friends, her more traditionally minded family worries about the fact that she’s still single at the advanced age of 28. When 40-year-old business associate Takako proposes marriage, Noriko’s family press her into accepting. But when her widowed childhood friend Kenkichi returns to the neighborhood, she finds her heart leading in another direction.

#918: Good Morning

qpimwwgwqcqw5rskfknwknhmle3#918 – Good Morning, (お早よう), 1959, Yasujirō Ozu
Japan

A lighthearted take on director Yasujiro Ozu’s perennial theme of the challenges of inter­generational relationships, Good Morning tells the story of two young boys who stop speaking in protest after their parents refuse to buy a television set. Ozu weaves a wealth of subtle gags through a family portrait as rich as those of his dramatic films, mocking the foibles of the adult world through the eyes of his child protagonists. Shot in stunning color and set in a suburb of Tokyo where housewives gossip about the neighbors’ new washing machine and unemployed husbands look for work as door-to-door salesmen, this charming comedy refashions Ozu’s own silent classic I Was Born, But… to gently satirize consumerism in postwar Japan.